Apple continues to play nice, introduces Maps section in App Store

Apple continues to play nice, introduces Maps section in App StoreApple CEO Tim Cook stunned the world on Friday, with an open letter to customers apologising for "falling short" on the company’s in-house Maps app.

Better still, they’ve only gone and added a bloomin’ Maps section to the App Store, offering alternative mapping solutions to iOS 6's Apple Maps. What the...?

The recommended apps include efforts from Waze, ForeverMap, NAVIGON, AA, Garmin and Bing.

But wait, Apple’s helpfulness knows no bounds. On Friday, we mentioned that Tim’s letter suggested creating a shortcut for Google or Nokia maps on your iDevices’s home screen. How does full instructions on the Apple site sound?

Finally, Team Cupertino has changed the description of its Maps app on the Apple site. It used to read: “All of which may just make this app the most beautiful, powerful mapping service ever.”

The new, significantly more modest description reads: “All in a beautiful vector-based interface that scales and zooms with ease.”

Great stuff. Oh, in case you’ve been sleeping under a rock for the past couple of weeks, Apple’s Maps app controversially replaced Google Maps in iOS 6, with a number of shortcomings making headline news (because there’s nothing more important going on in the world).

Still confused? Check out Apple Maps: a bit rubbish?

via: 9to5mac

Read more about: Apple iPad 3Apple iPhone 5iOSApple iPad 2Apple iPhone 3GSApple iPhone 4Apple iPhone 4S

Add a comment
10 comments

JanSt / MOD  Oct. 1, 2012 at 12:24

stunned the world

That explains it....

Pondlife  Oct. 1, 2012 at 12:54

Apple increasingly seem surprised that it's not as impressive as they made it out to be..

Dougal1709  Oct. 1, 2012 at 14:38

What would be nice would be if Apple actually offered their users some money to buy one of these working maps apps.

JanSt / MOD  Oct. 1, 2012 at 15:00

What would be nice would be if Apple actually offered their users some money to buy one of these working maps apps.

Why would they do that? There are free alternatives. You can access Google maps and Nokia's via Safari, and there are free apps in iTunes.

Dougal1709  Oct. 1, 2012 at 15:07

As an apology to their users for removing a perfectly good maps app and replacing it with a rubbish one for no reason other than bloody-mindedness. They have basically said "Sorry we've taken away the perfectly good free maps app and replaced it with one that doesn't work, here's some suggestions of some you can use half of which will cost you over twenty five pounds".

JanSt / MOD  Oct. 1, 2012 at 15:23

As an apology to their users for removing a perfectly good maps app and replacing it with a rubbish one for no reason other than bloody-mindedness. They have basically said "Sorry we've taken away the perfectly good free maps app and replaced it with one that doesn't work, here's some suggestions of some you can use half of which will cost you over twenty five pounds".



I getcha, but the iPhone's not a sat nav.
And what next? Every time a popular app crashes? Every time a dev packs in? Everytime a service changes API (as, e.g. with Twitter and 3rd party apps now - for example: NOT a single Twitter app for webOS anymore)???

People bought 5 million iPhones the first 3 days, and 100 million iDevice owners updated to iOS 6 - KNOWING about the maps.

We can talk about sheep-this, and cult-that... it doesn't change the fact that EVERY OEM changes stuff, and quite often against popular wishes - see the SGS3 (and other phones) dropping Mass Storage Mode!

As to "bloody-mindedness" being the sole reason - I assume you know that is not so?!
Apple are a business. Maps make some pretty money for Nokia and Google etc... Why would Apple not want to make money?
Not to mention - Google refused to add features in the iOS version of Maps that are present on Android phones. I can kind of understand why Apple aren't to pleased about that.
They have to think long-term - as a business. Whether we like'em for it or not.

jonbren  Oct. 2, 2012 at 01:45

As an apology to their users for removing a perfectly good maps app and replacing it with a rubbish one for no reason other than bloody-mindedness. They have basically said "Sorry we've taken away the perfectly good free maps app and replaced it with one that doesn't work, here's some suggestions of some you can use half of which will cost you over twenty five pounds".


Google Maps wasn't perfect either....many times it gave me wrong directions and would not choose the shortest route. This first edition of Apple Maps shows much more promise than Google's first stab at Maps.

JanSt / MOD  Oct. 2, 2012 at 12:01

Indeed, jonbren.
But it seems much stronger than Apple's reality distortion field, is the ever accelerating craving to get stufffstuffstuffstufff free and now and perfect. And if not perfect, then ever so slightly flawed so we can all froth and write about it until the cows come home.

I'm no Apple fan (boy), but I'm getting very annoyed by this.

Thankfully, PCMAG, of all places, put some bite back into the reality sandwich - which is why I'm not just gonna link to it, but, hey, I'll steal some, too:

I've never heard anything as ludicrous as the fuss made over the inadequacy of Apple Maps and the notion that Tim Cook is losing control over Apple. The company is on a tear and the newest iPhone 5 is a remarkable gem of a smartphone. If the product has a flaw, it is not Maps—it's that it seems too valuable and precious to carry around. It's that glamorous. (Note that these words are coming from a notorious Apple-basher.)

All the criticism of Cook stems from Maps-gate. The media pounced to an extreme. VentureBeat even reported that Apple changed some of its promotional copy on its site, removing the claim that iOS 6 Maps is the "most powerful mapping service ever." Holy crap. Stop the presses!

Here is a snippet of the "investigative report:"

Apple's website previously described Maps with the following language: "Designed by Apple from the ground up, Maps gives you turn-by-turn spoken directions, interactive 3D views, and the stunning Flyover feature. All of which may just make this app the most beautiful, powerful mapping service ever."

But sharp-eyed tech writer Amit Agarwal noticed this morning that Apple changed the second sentence of that copy to read: "All in a beautiful vector-based interface that scales and zooms with ease."


Critics claim, "This wouldn't happen if Steve Jobs was in charge!" but who can say that for sure? Maybe Steve would have merely covered up the flaws better. What do you think the so-called "reality distortion field" was all about, anyway?
http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2410428,00.asp

Pondlife  Oct. 2, 2012 at 16:12

Oh come on even apple admit it's crap

JanSt / MOD  Oct. 2, 2012 at 16:16

Oh come on even apple admit it's crap

Yes, BUT that is NOT at all the point.

Email:

You don't need an account to comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

Comment: