JanSt

What's in Apple's oleo-resistant screen film?

Wondering what Apple exactly apply to the iPhone's and Touch iPod's screen to keep fingerprints off? I know a few people with Ni-allergies who get blisters on their fingers and palms using those devices for prolonged periods...

Most Useful Answer Infinite Element  Feb. 2, 2011 at 16:09

I've never heard of anyone getting blisters using an iDevice touchscreen. Or any touchscreen for that matter.

It sounds like perhaps their skin just isn't made for touchscreen. I don't think Apple apply anything noticably different to any other manufacturer.

Like most of the higher quality touchscreen devices, all iDevices are capactitive rather than resistive, so it uses the electricity in your fingers to register where you're pressing, rather than the pressure you're applying. Perhaps that has something to do with it, but it sounds very strange.

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Infinite Element  Feb. 2, 2011 at 16:09

I've never heard of anyone getting blisters using an iDevice touchscreen. Or any touchscreen for that matter.

It sounds like perhaps their skin just isn't made for touchscreen. I don't think Apple apply anything noticably different to any other manufacturer.

Like most of the higher quality touchscreen devices, all iDevices are capactitive rather than resistive, so it uses the electricity in your fingers to register where you're pressing, rather than the pressure you're applying. Perhaps that has something to do with it, but it sounds very strange.

JanSt / MOD  Feb. 2, 2011 at 16:23

I know, it is odd. Though it is also odd that the exact ingredients list is hard to track down. It is not some kind of anti-Apple placebo effect, though. One of the folks loves the iPhone, but eventually had to get rid of it. Instant improvement. Then he fell for the appeal of the new iPod Touch, and while he was sorting apps etc you could literally see the skin irritations appear. He uses a 50p screen cover now, and no more problems. LOL
Well, no cause for a CDC alert, I suppose ;)

mrew42  Feb. 2, 2011 at 16:34

I can just imagine Apple's response to the accusation that their touchscreen promote skin problems. "Well don't touch it that way!"

JanSt / MOD  Feb. 2, 2011 at 17:07

:p

Touchscreener  Aug. 12, 2011 at 22:15

I just got my first touch screen phone a week ago and now have a blister only on my index finger. Obviously there is something in the screen material. I have an lg optimus v android. I feel sorry for the people in the factory.

heatnotelectricity  Aug. 15, 2011 at 13:50

so it uses the electricity in your fingers to register where you're pressing, rather than the pressure you're applying. Perhaps that has something to do with it, but it sounds very strange.

Electricity? It uses the heat from the finger to register a touch on the screen.

skinPerson  Jan. 2, 2013 at 09:15

I have issues with my fingers and thumbs with I use the screens on my HTC phone. The skin gets dry and cracks after prolonged use. I think this is not specific to apple.

JanSt / MOD  Jan. 2, 2013 at 11:33

I have issues with my fingers and thumbs with I use the screens on my HTC phone. The skin gets dry and cracks after prolonged use. I think this is not specific to apple.

Interesting.
I find it odd that they don't have to publish that.

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