JanSt

About to be arrested? Reboot your iPhone...

Thought I'd share this interesting bit of legality I spotted on Lifehacker:

The Virginia Circuit Court ruled this week that you don't have to give up your passcode to police if you're detained. That's great news, but apparently fingerprints are a different story, so if you have Touch ID enabled, you could still be forced to unlock your phone.

So, if your iPhone 5S, 6 or 6 Plus is secured by TouchID, you and your pinkies are in trouble. However, whenever you reboot your TouchID iPhone, it requires that you input your passcode before you can unlock it the 1st time.
via Lifehacker

Obviously, the Virginia district court doesn't yet have jurisdiction in the UK,
But, you know...

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8 comments

matt101101 / MOD  Nov. 3, 2014 at 13:28

You don't have to unlock your phone if you're detained here, hell, you don't have to unlock it even if you're actually arrested. That said, with a search warrant (which wouldn't be too hard to get hold of if they thought something on your phone was relevant to the offence for which you'd been arrested - highly likely in the modern day), the Police would have permission to access your phone, so you might as well unlock for them before they potentially ruin it (or all the data on it) trying to bypass the security.

As for fingerprints, I'm not sure, but I'd hope they would not be allowed to use your fingerprints which they took when they arrested you in order to access a locked phone. That said, with some of the crazy powers the Police in the UK have been given over the years, it wouldn't surprise me if they were allowed to access a locked phone using arrest fingerprints.

JanSt / MOD  Nov. 3, 2014 at 13:38

Yes...
I think the issue in certain jurisdictions is that 'Law Enforcement' is somewhat casual when it comes to 'taking stuff' for the heck of it.
In the past, police in some states in the US have copied the entire content of people's smartphones in routine traffic stops.

"Not too bad, cause, like, I have nothing to hide"??? Ah, yes, but wait until you have. Something to hide, or a little indiscretion to lie about. Because, as we know, 'they' tend to hold on to things, and, sometimes, bend it to their future needs.

matt101101 / MOD  Nov. 3, 2014 at 13:44

Yes...
I think the issue in certain jurisdictions is that 'Law Enforcement' is somewhat casual when it comes to 'taking stuff' for the heck of it.
In the past, police in some states in the US have copied the entire content of people's smartphones in routine traffic stops.

"Not too bad, cause, like, I have nothing to hide"??? Ah, yes, but wait until you have. Something to hide, or a little indiscretion to lie about. Because, as we know, 'they' tend to hold on to things, and, sometimes, bend it to their future needs.

'Cos 'Murica! War on Terror, War on Drugs etc, etc...blah, blah....

The Police over there are legalised thugs with access to almost unlimited resources (judging by the fact their SWAT team members are better equipped than their infantry soldiers who were/are...I've lost track...fighting in Iraq/Afghanistan).

Ahh, the good old "you'll do it if you've got nothing to hide". Sorry, Officer, maybe I just think you're a t**t and I don't want to show you my personal data.

Eugh, I'm so glad I don't live in their very rich 3rd world country.

JanSt / MOD  Nov. 3, 2014 at 13:50

^ commie!
Well, Matt, sometimes you need to sacrifice your privacy, your civil rights, your private property, health care, schooling, common sense and world peace IF you wanna live in the bestest democracy evah!
I bet you haven't even served! :p

matt101101 / MOD  Nov. 3, 2014 at 13:54

^ commie!
I bet you haven't even served! :p

Damn, you caught me out, I haven't served :(.

JanSt / MOD  Nov. 3, 2014 at 14:11

^ commie!
I bet you haven't even served! :p

Damn, you caught me out, I haven't served :(.


10 Hail Maries and 2 Seasons of Homeland will fix you! :p

Adrian7  Nov. 20, 2014 at 17:45

Actually in the UK RIPA *forces* you to disclose *any* passwords - failure to do so will get you jailed. So it is much much worse. In the US you can keep your silence.

JanSt / MOD  Nov. 20, 2014 at 17:59

Actually in the UK RIPA *forces* you to disclose *any* passwords - failure to do so will get you jailed. So it is much much worse. In the US you can keep your silence.

Yep...
I believe the UK and Germany have a number of provisions that even a lovechild of Obama and Barbara Bush wouldn't dare pull off in the US of A...

Dire times. Dire....

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