Barnes & Noble launches Nook tablet duo in the UK

Barnes & Noble launches Nook tablet duo in the UKWe're quite excited at the prospect of seeing Amazon's Kindle Fire and Kindle Fire HD touch down on UK soil, but it's certainly not going to have things all its own way when it does.

Especially now that rival US bookmonger Barnes & Noble has decided to crash the party with its own pair of competitively priced Android tablets, the newly announced Nook HD and Nook HD+.

The Nook line of e-readers has been around for a few years now in the US, where it slugs it out toe-to-toe with Amazon's Kindle for the market share high ground, but until today it hasn't managed to make its way past border control into the wider world.

So what's the deal and how do the Nook HD and Nook HD+ stack up against their Amazon rivals?

On first impressions, rather well it has to be said. The base 7-inch Nook HD is fully deserving of its suffix thanks to a screen resolution of 1440 x 900, which works out at a class-leading 243ppi.

It's light on its feet too, weighing in at just 315g, and you can choose between “snow” and “smoke” on the colour front (who makes this stuff up?).

Under the hood is a 1.3GHz dual-core processor, 1GB of RAM, a choice of 8GB or 16GB of internal storage and a generous 4,000mAh of battery juice, while Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich is tasked with OS duties.

And so to the all-important price tag, and B&N isn't looking to take any prisoners: the 8GB variant will set you back just £159, with its larger capacity brother costing £30 more. There will be plenty of debate about how the specification matches up to its rivals', but on price alone it's a serious play for some of the entry-level tablet action, and certainly a viable alternative to the Kindle Fire and Google's Nexus 7 slates.

Opt for the Nook HD+, however, and you'll have a further 2 inches of screen size to play with, complete with an iPad-bothering resolution of 1920 x 1280 (256ppi).

It's still just a dual-core processor running the show, though it's been clocked at a faster 1.5GHz, while storage options have been bumped to 16GB or 32GB.

Like its downmarket brother, the Nook HD+ ships with Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich pre-installed, and price-wise you're looking at £229 (16GB) and £269 (32GB).

All four models will go on sale in November, which – needless to say – is just in time for the Christmas spending bonanza.

Read more about: AndroidNook HDNook HD+

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7 comments

JanSt / MOD  Sep. 26, 2012 at 10:54

I had the first Nook Color, and I cannot stress enough that I neither asked for it, nor paid for it. Also: it's one of the 3 worst things I ever had and one of the other 2 was a broken neck

Stelph  Sep. 26, 2012 at 11:03

Do we not get the e-ink Nook touch then? Shame

One advantage of the Nook touch over the kindle is you can root it and turn it into quite a snazzy e-ink android tablet. It even runs angry birds

CTPAHHIK  Sep. 26, 2012 at 11:04

E-Ink Nooks are better than Kindles.

CTPAHHIK  Sep. 26, 2012 at 11:05

Do we not get the e-ink Nook touch then? Shame

One advantage of the Nook touch over the kindle is you can root it and turn it into quite a snazzy e-ink android tablet. It even runs angry birds


Waste of time. Screen is not designed for that and you better off going for Nook Color - it has LCD + Android + same price as E-ink

tsgsupplisus  Sep. 27, 2012 at 13:23

Nice information on Brother

Stelph  Sep. 28, 2012 at 09:06

Do we not get the e-ink Nook touch then? Shame

One advantage of the Nook touch over the kindle is you can root it and turn it into quite a snazzy e-ink android tablet. It even runs angry birds


Waste of time. Screen is not designed for that and you better off going for Nook Color - it has LCD + Android + same price as E-ink


True, angry birds was a bad example, maybe something like chess or a turn based game wouldve been a better example. My point was that e-ink android tablets are useful since they give a staggering battery life and work so well out in the sunlight that at the low price point they give an excellent alternative to the Kindle which is a one trick pony

CTPAHHIK  Sep. 28, 2012 at 11:16

Chess might work or any other slow updating game. E-Ink displays draw battery when screen is drawn, afterwards there is no battery usage. Works great for books as you will not be flipping pages every second. As soon as you have something that updates screen often battery does not last long.
Another problem is WiFi - it's even worse than re-drawing screen. Idea behind WiFi is too connect, get your book and turn itself off. If you keep it running and connected battery drain is significant. You can get news reader setup that will dump data over WiFi for offline read.
I rooted mine and tried to run GMail and news readers, but gave up on it and restored to original firmware. Nook Color is better for rooting and tablet use. You have bigger battery to support color screen. Compared to screen power drain, WiFi use is insignificant. Nook Color is crap, but if you looking for cheap news reader, book reader and magazine subscriptions + basic android use it's OK @ $75.

I don't think that new color Nook will be any good. I think Nexus 7 is better. Same applies to Kindles.
I'm more concerned with choosing new E-Ink reader for future use.

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