Half of US consumers: we don’t need no 4G

Half of US consumers: we don’t need no 4GUK networks seem to think that the rollout of 4G is, like, The Most Important Thing Ever, with Everything Everywhere’s head start heralding The End of The World. But do consumers really understand – or care about – 4G?

The answer, according to a recent survey of 3,000 individuals in the United States of Americanos, is a resounding no.

The survey was conducted by the folks at Piper Jaffray, with the results published in a research note earlier this week.

The respondents were asked: “Which 4G Wireless Is, In Your Opinion, Better?” Here’s how the results panned out:

  • I don’t need 4G – 46.8%
  • They’re all the same – 25.7%
  • 4G LTE – 15.1%
  • 4G – 12.4%

Similarly, 51% of respondents said they didn’t know which network was the best for 4G, or that they’re all the same.

The poll also inquired about interest in the imminent iPhone 5, with 55% saying that they were considering it.

Going back to Everything Everywhere’s head start (since I have some space to fill), we don’t see it being that big a deal. A huge number of people are tied into lengthy contracts, and even for those who are free, we don’t see 4G being enough to convince them to jump network. Know wha’m sayin’?

via: Apple Insider

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9 comments

Sparkeh  Aug. 24, 2012 at 13:06

A similar(probably larger) percentage probably still think the world is 10,000 years old, so let not read into this too much...

Pondlife  Aug. 24, 2012 at 13:25

You don't see 4g as being big enough to change networks?
Given that we can transfer numbers pretty much anything better is big enough to change networks, I've certainly no brand loyalty to any of them.

The 3g picture looks much nicer so that wouldn't be a good way to sell it ;)

Treab  Aug. 24, 2012 at 13:33

A similar(probably larger) percentage probably still think the world is 10,000 years old, so let not read into this too much...

rofl :D best comment yet :D

peezle  Aug. 24, 2012 at 13:34

superfast mobile broadband, with super low data limits, I for one can't wait.

r3tract  Aug. 24, 2012 at 14:27

The "huge number of people are tied into lengthy contracts" argument against people adopting 4G is a bit of a non-argument don't you think?

There will be, as you say, people who will be tied into a contract, but statistically speaking the majority of mobile phone users will be coming to the end of their contract in the period in which EE have their head start. Ofwat state that 49% of mobile phones are tied to contracts: http://media.ofcom.org.uk/facts/. Say that even up to 25% of all mobile phones are tied into 18 month and 25% into 24 month contracts, that's still 2/3rds (12/18ths) and 1/2 (12/24ths) of those whose contracts will be up for renewal during that period. In reality there are probably fewer on those high end contracts, but even with these inflated figures it still means it's likely that of those who are tied into a contract at least 60% of those will be up for renewal during EE's monopoly. Or to put it another way - only (at the most, statistically speaking) 22% of all mobile phone users will be tied into a contract during the whole twelve month period.

If EE can market 4G in the right way it will enable them to capture a rather large percentage of those people. If you can get much faster speeds at the same (or only slightly greater) cost then a lot of people will make the switch.

Treab  Aug. 24, 2012 at 19:06

at least 60% of those will be up for renewal during EE's monopoly

... how exactly does those maths work out...

r3tract  Aug. 24, 2012 at 19:12

I was rounding up slightly, hence the use of the word "likely": (2/3*25+1/2*25)/50*100 = 58.3%

P.S how exactly does those English work out? ;)

jaybear88  Aug. 25, 2012 at 11:14

Who were these 3,000 participants? If this is true (http://techcrunch.com/2012/05/07/nielsen-smartphones-used-by-50-4-of-u-s-consumers-android-48-5-of-them/), then half the US isn't even using smartphones, therefore almost every person that is, wants 4g......

dcx_badass  Aug. 25, 2012 at 14:34

I agree, better signal on 3G (or even 2G) would be much more beneficial for the next few years at least, better coverage would bring faster speeds on 3G along with it (I imagine most don't see more than 10-25% of the speeds 3G can do).

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