KingSamurai

Do electronics really interfere with airplanes ???

I was asked to turn my Kindle off for takeoff/landing, but it's ok to read a book. Could a Kindle really interfere with an airplane?!?!

Most Useful Answer matt101101  Aug. 29, 2012 at 19:36

When there's lives at risk, you can understand them playing it safe. There no confirmed reports of such interference, but even if it's a 1 in a billion chance, it's not worth letting people use it for those 15 minutes before take-off/landing.

Same goes for not using phones in petrol stations.

There's a far greater chance of pilot error during take off or landing than a mobile phone interfering with anything, never mind interfering in a way which ends up harming people (remember, commercial jets happily and safely fly through lightning storms all the time). Pilot error has killed people, lots of people. Mobile phones on planes (bar any links to explosive devices being linked to one) have never harmed anyone.

Same goes for fuel stations, that large fossil fuel burning lump of metal under the bonnet of your car, which we call an engine, is far more likely to start a fuel fire than your mobile phone. Despite that, you don't have to push your car into and out of the fuel station though, do you?

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Pondlife  Aug. 29, 2012 at 18:10

Seems unlikely at best, wifi version?
Was reading about an airline putting wifi on planes earlier in the week.
During 11/9 the panicking passengers on phones on the planes didn't have any effect on planes...

matt101101 / MOD  Aug. 29, 2012 at 18:59

It's all bullsh*t, it's a a way to force people into using the extremely expensive in-flight phone. There has NEVER been a recorded case of any electronic device (bar electronically controlled explosives) bringing down, or even affecting, an aeroplane.

matt101101 / MOD  Aug. 29, 2012 at 19:02

The conclusion from a report which Boeing, the aircraft manufacturer, conducted:

"As a result of these and other investigations, Boeing has not been able to find a definite correlation between PEDs (Personal Electronic Devices) and the associated reported airplane anomalies."

blizzard7  Aug. 29, 2012 at 19:28

When there's lives at risk, you can understand them playing it safe. There no confirmed reports of such interference, but even if it's a 1 in a billion chance, it's not worth letting people use it for those 15 minutes before take-off/landing.

Same goes for not using phones in petrol stations.

matt101101 / MOD  Aug. 29, 2012 at 19:36

When there's lives at risk, you can understand them playing it safe. There no confirmed reports of such interference, but even if it's a 1 in a billion chance, it's not worth letting people use it for those 15 minutes before take-off/landing.

Same goes for not using phones in petrol stations.

There's a far greater chance of pilot error during take off or landing than a mobile phone interfering with anything, never mind interfering in a way which ends up harming people (remember, commercial jets happily and safely fly through lightning storms all the time). Pilot error has killed people, lots of people. Mobile phones on planes (bar any links to explosive devices being linked to one) have never harmed anyone.

Same goes for fuel stations, that large fossil fuel burning lump of metal under the bonnet of your car, which we call an engine, is far more likely to start a fuel fire than your mobile phone. Despite that, you don't have to push your car into and out of the fuel station though, do you?

Pondlife  Aug. 29, 2012 at 20:25

Give you pretty good odds that the air crew don't switch their phones off, plus if we know anything from cinema, televised snooker or the theatre that there's always going to be some phones turned on.
On the same lines as pilot error seems to have been a few pilots over the alcohol limit issues in the news last few years.
The petrol pumps seem to be getting more and more features too..

matt101101 / MOD  Aug. 29, 2012 at 20:43

The petrol pumps seem to be getting more and more features too..
I understood and agreed with everything apart from that^^^

What did you mean? Fuel pumps 'round here just pump fuel...

Pondlife  Aug. 29, 2012 at 21:02

Seeing more and more pay at the pump machines with chip and pin readers, receipt printers

matt101101 / MOD  Aug. 29, 2012 at 21:16

Seeing more and more pay at the pump machines with chip and pin readers, receipt printers
Oh yeah, the Asda and Tesco near me have those but you have to say how much you want to spend before you dispense the fuel. I prefer to just fill the car then pay normally.

Pondlife  Aug. 29, 2012 at 21:23

Not sure how any of the ones here work as don't like the concept, Shell has it too.

matt101101 / MOD  Aug. 29, 2012 at 21:29

Not sure how any of the ones here work as don't like the concept, Shell has it too.
Nor do I, I've only used it once when the queue to pay at Tesco was out of the shop door and I was late picking my daughter up, but that's it.

CTPAHHIK  Aug. 30, 2012 at 10:17

WiFi cannot interfere with airplanes - it's not powerful enough.
Cell phone can interfere with radar and communication of older planes.

Airplane manual says that all electronic devices need to be turned off during take off and landing. Kindle is an electronic device. Flight attendant's average IQ is in single digits, otherwise, they would not be flight attendants.

Kindle e-reader does not turns off - it goes to stand by. Next time someone asks you to turn off Kindle tell them you need to turn off you watch as well, but cannot figure out how to do and need help. Quartz watch is an electronic device :p

gmailfanboy  Aug. 30, 2012 at 11:36

What about digital watches, aren't they technically "electronic" devices?

jaybear88  Aug. 30, 2012 at 12:57

Slightly off-topic (but not really), has mobile phone shielding changed drastically in the past few years? I remember being able to tell if someone was getting a text message before it beeped, simply by the interference it caused in every speaker in the room that had power going to them, doesn't seem to be the case anymore?

jaybear88  Aug. 30, 2012 at 13:04

And on the phones in petrol stations bit;

Turbo chargers can reach temperatures in excess of 1000 degress celcius, and even an average exhaust from a granny-car averages around 250 celcius. Since petrols auto-ignition point is 280 degrees, if there are petrol vapours that could catch from a faulty phone, it's already too late.

Pondlife  Aug. 30, 2012 at 13:04

Seems more of a 2g issue than 3g just like the light up devices (phone chairs and the like) but my phone does still interfere with car stereo if less than about 6" away from head unit.

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