Google Translate goes offline in 50 languages, take *that* Samsung

Google Translate goes offline in 50 languages, take *that* SamsungOne of the many features Samsung made a song and dance about at the Galaxy S4 launch two weeks ago was S Translate, which is capable of offline translation in a handful of languages. Er, nine I believe.

Not to be outdone, Mountain View has announced that its Google Translate app is going offline for no less than 50 languages. Cripes.

That’s the word straight from the official Android blog, with a post titled The World’s Languages in Your Pocket (No Internet Required).

It makes huge sense, given that Google Translate is arguably of greatest use while abroad, and it’s probably fair to say that many – if not most – travellers won’t have data roaming activated, or will at least be watching the pennies.

Now you can stop some guy in the street in Albania and ask him where the best stripclub be at - at no extra cost.

Google reveals that any of the 50 languages can be downloaded to your device for offline use, however expect functionality to be “less comprehensive” than the online equivalent.

Is it just me, or is this a direct – and weighty – response to the Samsung Galaxy S4’s S Translate feature? The tension between Google and Samsung is clearly mounting (joke (maybe)).

What's that? Link to Google Translate on Google Play? Right here.

Read more about: Android

Add a comment
5 comments

JanSt / MOD  Mar. 28, 2013 at 16:13

Total unverständlich, Du Schweinehund!

fdfd67  Mar. 28, 2013 at 17:26

The way you've worded your article makes it seem as if the service has been taken offline (i.e. is no longer functioning) as opposed to them having added offline-capabilities.

JanSt / MOD  Mar. 28, 2013 at 23:45

The way you've worded your article makes it seem as if the service has been taken offline (i.e. is no longer functioning) as opposed to them having added offline-capabilities.

+1
(especially in connection to the announced murder of its news reader thingy)

socialjeebus  Mar. 29, 2013 at 17:35

The problem is that it's pretty much unusable for anything beyond simple phrases and greetings.

As I'm sure S Translate will be.

There's no accounting for context hence the gibberish that usually comes.

JanSt / MOD  Mar. 29, 2013 at 21:23

The problem is that it's pretty much unusable for anything beyond simple phrases and greetings.

As I'm sure S Translate will be.

There's no accounting for context hence the gibberish that usually comes.


Yep.
It's amazing: I studied linguistics in the '80s, and boy have we not come far since!

Email:

You don't need an account to comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

Comment: