shuwaz

Whatever happened to lowering your tariff?

I thought you could lower you tariff once you reached 50% of the way through your contract? 3 would disagree with me but what about the rest?

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11 comments

Pondlife  Mar. 18, 2013 at 22:10

They wised up?

shuwaz  Mar. 18, 2013 at 22:42

It's tragic, making most decent phones a rip-off on contract.

CTPAHHIK  Mar. 19, 2013 at 17:39

Buy it SIM free.

matt101101 / MOD  Mar. 19, 2013 at 17:42

The release day contract price of phones has fallen in the past few years, I mean you can get the S4 (which isn't even out yet) for £31 per month with decent allowances. No doubt there will be better deals than that before the end of April...

Also, a contract's a contract. You sign it because you agree with the terms, not because you hope you can change those terms 50% of the way through the minimum contract duration.

AhmadCentral  Mar. 19, 2013 at 17:48

ALL networks have stopped this now.

You can still upgrade your tariff and pay more i think, but can't downgrade.

shuwaz  Mar. 19, 2013 at 20:06

ALL networks have stopped this now.

You can still upgrade your tariff and pay more i think, but can't downgrade.


Yeah Ahmed that's the point, contracts are supposed to have flexibility and (to matt101101) the fact that you can upgrade but not downgrade shows double-standards for a contract.

You can't predict the future and your circumstances can change. That was the beauty of previous contracts, you could change when it suited you. Even half way through the contract was good enough. But to have no flexibility at all is scandalous. Its signed the end of contracts (over twelve months) for me.

matt101101 / MOD  Mar. 19, 2013 at 20:19

ALL networks have stopped this now.

You can still upgrade your tariff and pay more i think, but can't downgrade.


Yeah Ahmed that's the point, contracts are supposed to have flexibility and (to matt101101) the fact that you can upgrade but not downgrade shows double-standards for a contract.

You can't predict the future and your circumstances can change. That was the beauty of previous contracts, you could change when it suited you. Even half way through the contract was good enough. But to have no flexibility at all is scandalous. Its signed the end of contracts (over twelve months) for me.

You're signing up to a MINIMUM term, MINIMUM cost, contract. If you don't agree with the initial terms, don't sign it. What kind of crappy company would they be if they refused to accept more money from you? Imagine explaining that one to the shareholders...

Oh and from a legal perspective, the phrase 'contracts are supposed to have flexibility' is, to put it politely, inaccurate. A contract is a legally binding agreement, unless some kind of flexibility is written into the contract itself, there's no room for "I don't like it anymore, so I want to change it". You may not like it, but that's how English (and AFAIK, most other country's) contract law works.

AhmadCentral  Mar. 19, 2013 at 20:39

ALL networks have stopped this now.

You can still upgrade your tariff and pay more i think, but can't downgrade.


Yeah Ahmed that's the point, contracts are supposed to have flexibility and (to matt101101) the fact that you can upgrade but not downgrade shows double-standards for a contract.

You can't predict the future and your circumstances can change. That was the beauty of previous contracts, you could change when it suited you. Even half way through the contract was good enough. But to have no flexibility at all is scandalous. Its signed the end of contracts (over twelve months) for me.


Ok first of, it's "Ahmad". :P

And secondly i agree, it is a double standard but the contract you sign up for says they can change the T&C at any time. Same contract says they can increase your price. So it sucks how they can do this sort of stuff and at the end of the day the contracts are there for the networks to tie you in and make money off you. There are various petitions into getting this kind of thing stopped but we all know how "useful" ofcom are when it comes to this sort of thing.

shuwaz  Mar. 19, 2013 at 23:19

ALL networks have stopped this now.

You can still upgrade your tariff and pay more i think, but can't downgrade.


Yeah Ahmed that's the point, contracts are supposed to have flexibility and (to matt101101) the fact that you can upgrade but not downgrade shows double-standards for a contract.

You can't predict the future and your circumstances can change. That was the beauty of previous contracts, you could change when it suited you. Even half way through the contract was good enough. But to have no flexibility at all is scandalous. Its signed the end of contracts (over twelve months) for me.


Ok first of, it's "Ahmad". :P

And secondly i agree, it is a double standard but the contract you sign up for says they can change the T&C at any time. Same contract says they can increase your price. So it sucks how they can do this sort of stuff and at the end of the day the contracts are there for the networks to tie you in and make money off you. There are various petitions into getting this kind of thing stopped but we all know how "useful" ofcom are when it comes to this sort of thing.


Ahh come on Matt my man, chill out, take it easy (you know that's not what I meant).

I hate to trigger a potential debate but I can't resist replying to this comment:

Oh and from a legal perspective, the phrase 'contracts are supposed to have flexibility' is, to put it politely, inaccurate...

So what was it before when they did offer flexibility? A casual agreement between two strangers?


As for you Ahmed (erm I mean Ahmad) yeah you got my point spot on. Its not about the legal issues or refusing to accept more money (although advising you on the best deal would be better quality customer service) its about good companies going bad.

They make plenty of money and they should work more on continuous service improvement. This is what naturally makes a good company (case and point: Apple - yeuck! Can't believe I just said that.).

matt101101 / MOD  Mar. 19, 2013 at 23:36

So what was it before when they did offer flexibility? A casual agreement between two strangers?
Nice picking and choosing of my words ;)

The sentence I wrote just after that answers your question :p.

shuwaz  Mar. 20, 2013 at 00:55

So what was it before when they did offer flexibility? A casual agreement between two strangers?
Nice picking and choosing of my words ;)

The sentence I wrote just after that answers your question :p.


Nice picking and choosing of my words ;)

Likewise ;)

Would you prefer me to quote the entire passage back to you? It's not like you don't know what you've written or can't refer back to it, its clearly visible. My response was short and concise (hence an extracted quotation was used).

The sentence I wrote just after that answers your question :p

Question: So what was it before when they did offer flexibility? A casual agreement between two strangers?
Answer: A contract is a legally binding agreement, unless some kind of flexibility is written into the contract itself, there's no room for "I don't like it anymore, so I want to change it.

Come on Matt matey, in the first sentence (of your second paragraph) you said contracts don't have flexibility (however up until recently they did), then in the sentence after it you said, yes they can but only if its agreed in the contract.

Make up your mind, either they did or didn't.

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