tezzasmif

Hi, do you physically need to show a payg sim to get this deal? Thanks

Most Useful Answer papamabundi  Dec. 13, 2012 at 07:47

I recently bought a lumia 800 from P4u in Cwmbran. I am on Virgin and the only way they would let me get the phone was I had to lend a friends Tmobile sim, which they checked for recent topup (there has to be a small amount of credit on there). Even then they insisted on cutting her Tmobile sim into a micro sim, so i had to buy her an adapter. It was a right pain but was the cheapest deal and i was lucky she was so helpful.

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JanSt / MOD  Dec. 12, 2012 at 19:54

what deal? You hit "submit" a bit too soon ;)

matt101101 / MOD  Dec. 12, 2012 at 21:08

I'd go for yes, if I had to give you an answer...more info may help though :p.

tezzasmif  Dec. 12, 2012 at 21:45

Doh moment. :) I meant the phones 4 u deal in store on the payg nokia lumia 800. Does anyone know if they accept giff gaff sims (they are powered by o2 after all)
Thanks

Pondlife  Dec. 12, 2012 at 22:32

If it's a pay and go upgrade deal probably do need to have the sim there. Although p4u have let me buy my parents upgrades from few hundred miles away in the past.. Though that may have been helped by the phones they wanted being so low end anyway.

Pondlife  Dec. 13, 2012 at 01:31

Above written before moderated 2nd post by op.
And no chance with giffgaff, or tesco or virgin, etc
3, orange, vodafone and o2 will be it.

papamabundi  Dec. 13, 2012 at 07:47

I recently bought a lumia 800 from P4u in Cwmbran. I am on Virgin and the only way they would let me get the phone was I had to lend a friends Tmobile sim, which they checked for recent topup (there has to be a small amount of credit on there). Even then they insisted on cutting her Tmobile sim into a micro sim, so i had to buy her an adapter. It was a right pain but was the cheapest deal and i was lucky she was so helpful.

CTPAHHIK  Dec. 13, 2012 at 08:33

You have to be using network you are buying phone for in order to avoid buying PAYG SIM. They will ask for your number to verify. If number is active you should be clear.
There is a high chance that store will try sell you PAYG SIM anyways, at which point make a big fuss about it or ask them to credit your existing account. They will be unable to do that and are required to sell you a phone without SIM.

Pondlife  Dec. 13, 2012 at 13:52

Required? Don't think any shop is ever required to sell you anything.

CTPAHHIK  Dec. 13, 2012 at 14:05

You can either sell to everyone or not at all. Choosing and picking would be discrimination. So, yeah, you are required or you closed down as soon as someone bring up a case.

Remember Apple not taking cash???

Pondlife  Dec. 13, 2012 at 14:27

You really aren't.
Nope don't recall that.
Besides which that doesn't mean they couldn't refuse to sell a phone without a sim anyway.

matt101101 / MOD  Dec. 13, 2012 at 15:54

You can either sell to everyone or not at all. Choosing and picking would be discrimination. So, yeah, you are required or you closed down as soon as someone bring up a case.

Remember Apple not taking cash???

Shops displaying goods is a mere invitation to treat, not an offer to sell. You (the buyer) make the offer to buy and it's then up to the shop to choose whether or not to accept that offer. The shop has NO obligation to sell to you, which is why mis-prices don't have to be honoured.

There are some pretty basic principles of English contract law in there, discrimination and choosing not to accept an offer in a would be contract are entirely different things.

CTPAHHIK  Dec. 13, 2012 at 17:15

You can either sell to everyone or not at all. Choosing and picking would be discrimination. So, yeah, you are required or you closed down as soon as someone bring up a case.

Remember Apple not taking cash???

Shops displaying goods is a mere invitation to treat, not an offer to sell. You (the buyer) make the offer to buy and it's then up to the shop to choose whether or not to accept that offer. The shop has NO obligation to sell to you, which is why mis-prices don't have to be honoured.

There are some pretty basic principles of English contract law in there, discrimination and choosing not to accept an offer in a would be contract are entirely different things.


An example would be selling a product to Pondi and not selling it to me, when both of us are willing to pay same amount. Unless Pondi's order is cancelled (mis-price) or retailer is out of stock, retailer is required to sell it to me. There could be a lot of reasons why retailer would not want to proceed with transaction. However, if it's clear that after refusing to sell to you retailer continues to sell product to other customers, that would be discrimination. You are back to either selling it under same conditions to everyone or not selling it at all.

No online examples, please. We are taking about being physically in the store.

Pondlife  Dec. 13, 2012 at 18:01

They aren't. They just aren't.

Pondlife  Dec. 13, 2012 at 18:11

But we are getting away from the point. They could refuse to sell the phone without the sim card. They may not be likely to as they'll want the sale and people on hukd have said salesmen have gone hunting for eligible numbers to use for upgrades in the past.

But they are under no obligation to sell you a phone as an upgrade.

matt101101 / MOD  Dec. 13, 2012 at 19:22

But they are under no obligation to sell you a phone
It can be left at that.

JanSt / MOD  Dec. 13, 2012 at 21:02

They aren't. They just aren't.

Indeed... not in Ireland, not in Germany. And afaik NOT in the UK, either. I can ask you to leave the shop for no reason. If I am stupid enough to state an illegal reason, then we have a different matter at hand. Not saying it's 'good' business practice, but there are times when it's done.

matt101101 / MOD  Dec. 13, 2012 at 23:55

They aren't. They just aren't.

Indeed... not in Ireland, not in Germany. And afaik NOT in the UK, either. I can ask you to leave the shop for no reason. If I am stupid enough to state an illegal reason, then we have a different matter at hand. Not saying it's 'good' business practice, but there are times when it's done.

You're right, it's definitely the same here in the UK. People seem to have this idea that shops are legally bound to sell you something (as long as you meet any criteria required to purchase it, such as age) if you desire to purchase it.

Under English contract law, the act of purchasing anything involves formation of a bilateral contract. The shop's action of displaying goods is what's called an invitation to treat, inviting people to make an offer to purchase said goods. Once you (the buyer) has made this offer (by taking said goods to the checkout and offering up some type of payment), the shop then has to choose whether or not to accept your offer to enter into a legally binding contract. Consideration and the intention to create legal relations are also required to form a legally binding contract under English contract law, but they're totally irrelevant in the situation of refusal of sale and are both pretty much automatically included when you purchase something (you intended to buy, the shop intended to sell and you offered money for their goods).

It is at the point of would be acceptance that any shop has the right to refuse the sale of any goods to any would be customer, no explanation is required (it's probably safer from a legal standpoint to offer no explanation, just in case they try and sue your company for discrimination of dome form). You can also be asked to leave the shop with no explanation given, as shops are, at the end of the day, private property.

I have no idea how contract law works in other countries, or whether shops in other countries are forced to sell to people who ask them to (I can't imagine it though), but that's how the sale of goods works here in England. It's an indisputable fact, we all enter into these contracts (probably unknowingly, though the contract is still binding) every time we buy something from a shop.

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