HTC explains Desire HD Ice Cream Sandwich decision

HTC explains Desire HD Ice Cream Sandwich decisionIt was, then it wasn’t, then it was, and then it most definitely wasn’t. I’m rambling, of course, about the HTC Desire HD being upgraded to Ice Cream Sandwich (Android 4.0).

As you’d expect, there’s been a fair bit of backlash following the announcement, and HTC has come clean with a “further explanation”.

There were claims that HTC was simply being lazy. After all, the low-end HTC Desire C and the remarkably similar Thunderbolt (the latter essentially being the US Desire HD) are capable of handling Ice Cream Sandwich.

However, HTC says it’s all to do with user data. See, in order to upgrade the HTC Desire HD to Ice Cream Sandwich, device storage would have to be partitioned, and resultantly some user data would be overwritten.

HTC says: “While technically advanced [HTC Desire HD] users might find this solution acceptable, the majority of customers would not.”

Furthermore, some features and functionality “that customers are currently using” would be lost.

Still not satisfied? How about, er, “other technical limitations”?

In any case, no Ice Cream Sandwich for the HTC Desire HD. Having said that, this is starting to sound awfully like the HTC Desire Gingerbread (Android 2.3) fiasco, wherein users could manually upgrade at their own risk. Might we see a repeat here?

via: HTC blog

Read more about: HTC Desire HDAndroid

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6 comments

matt101101 / MOD  Jul. 28, 2012 at 18:28

Didn't the "advanced users only" Desire update invalidate the phone's warranty? I guess the same would be true for the DHD, so you might as well use CyanogenMod 9 (or 10, by then), instead of HTC's crippled, cut down version of Sense.

matt101101 / MOD  Jul. 28, 2012 at 18:29

On a side note, I do applaud HTC for actually coming out and telling the world what the problem actually is with the DHD ICS update, rather than just saying "it doesn't work".

JanSt / MOD  Jul. 28, 2012 at 19:57

Didn't the "advanced users only" Desire update invalidate the phone's warranty? I guess the same would be true for the DHD, so you might as well use CyanogenMod 9 (or 10, by then), instead of HTC's crippled, cut down version of Sense. HTC's warranty T&Cs are so bad, you may as well not have one...

LawrenceW  Jul. 28, 2012 at 22:29

Didn't the "advanced users only" Desire update invalidate the phone's warranty? I guess the same would be true for the DHD, so you might as well use CyanogenMod 9 (or 10, by then), instead of HTC's crippled, cut down version of Sense.

The problem is that ROMs such as CyanogenMod 9 can't be made for the Desire HD without the ICS kernel being released by HTC. This means that some of the phone's hardware doesn't work on any ICS ROMs, such as the video camera. For this reason, there isn't even an official CyanogenMod 9 for the DHD (only an unofficial "port" which doesn't have video recording at any sensible resolution).

The thing is, HTC won't even release the kernel. We know they've developed it, as Vodaphone let slip that they had seen a test version. If they release the kernel to the amateur developers, an awesome ROM would follow.

There's a petition to this effect:
http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/give-us-ics/

Pondlife  Jul. 29, 2012 at 00:13

On a side note, I do applaud HTC for actually coming out and telling the world what the problem actually is with the DHD ICS update, rather than just saying "it doesn't work".

Well the data bit is somewhat spurious and the other is largely just saying it doesn't work.

JanSt / MOD  Jul. 29, 2012 at 09:47

I agree with pondlife.
I'm not in favour of corporations playing nanny... Major software updates used to be that:'risky...
If HTC (and Samsung etc) did the right thing, they'd provide a proper backup solution with their phones.
Then repartitioning the storage wouldn't be a problem.
But no, Android OEMs pass the buck to 3rd party devs. Who can't do a perfect job when Kernels are locked and so on...
Major Symbian updates, e.g., have always killed everything, but Nokia put big money into providing a decent on-the-phone backup solution...

Same goes for HTCs promise to unlock phones... Come on - go to the dev site and go through with the process. Could it be more convoluted? It's easier to put ICS on the N9 than to unlock a HTC bootloader with HTC's tool.
you gotta be kidding!

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