HTC One mini supply issues make quarterly loss even more likely

HTC One mini supply issues make quarterly loss even more likelyTaiwanese manufacturer HTC has been stuck in a downward spiral for ages now, with things pretty much turning to crap after the success of the original HTC Desire.

In more bad news for the Taiwanese (as if we haven’t had enough already), we’re told that they’re facing supply issues with the HTC One mini, fuelling speculation of an imminent net quarterly loss.

That’s the word according to Reuters, which in turn gives credit to two anonymous sources that “declined to be identified because they were not authorized to speak on behalf of HTC”. Cheeky.

Source 1 says the HTC One mini supply issues are partly on account of “a casing shortage arising from design difficulties”.

The second guy chimes in to say that HTC is failing to meet telecom and consumer demand for the One mini, though crystal balls suggest the intended figure was only ever 200,000 or so per month.

Needless to say, HTC declined to comment, perhaps choosing instead to drown its sorrows in some bubble tea.

The Taiwanese manufacturer has struggled of late, despite garnering a ton of critical acclaim for the HTC One, widely hailed as the Sexiest Phone of All Time.

The HTC One Max will be their biggest phone to date (literally), though it’s keeping an oddly low profile. It was expected to make an appearance at IFA alongside the Samsung Galaxy Note 3, but failed to show face.

Back in 2011, HTC was very much the darling of the Android world, with the original HTC Desire considered a genuine iPhone beater. More recently, Samsung has dominated the Android scene, much to the chagrin of HTC, Sony, LG, and pretty much everyone who isn't Samsung.

Read more about: Android

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5 comments

JanSt / MOD  Sep. 24, 2013 at 20:25

Apple hold on to what - 20 to 40% (depending on source) of smartphone marketshare.
With essentially one (now 2) phone launched per year - plus a couple of iPads and iPods...
Compared to over 10,000 unique Android models it doesn't take Stephen Hawking to figure out that something is wrong with the bubble.
I reckon Nokia stand a better chance to survive with MS's WP than most Android makers whose name is not Samsung.
Nothing lasts forever.

matt101101 / MOD  Sep. 25, 2013 at 10:35

Apple hold on to what - 20 to 40% (depending on source) of smartphone marketshare.
With essentially one (now 2) phone launched per year - plus a couple of iPads and iPods...
Compared to over 10,000 unique Android models it doesn't take Stephen Hawking to figure out that something is wrong with the bubble.
I reckon Nokia stand a better chance to survive with MS's WP than most Android makers whose name is not Samsung.
Nothing lasts forever.

What he said ^^^

Basically, this:
http://appleinsider.com/articles/13/07/31/apple-takes-53-of-smartphone-profits-samsung-at-50-remainder-lose-money

matt101101 / MOD  Sep. 25, 2013 at 10:38

Just avoid the comments on that site I linked to, the apple juice in my fridge is less apple flavoured...

JanSt / MOD  Sep. 25, 2013 at 12:21

Thanks, matt.
Yep - thought so...
Android fans, imho, have it wrong. It's non-Samsung Android makers vs the rest. Apple are largely unaffected by new Galaxy launches.
I actually believe a Tizen Galaxy will sell better than any non-Samsung Android flagship provided they get the basic 3rd party apps onboard. The absence of Instagram etc hurt WP badly.

matt101101 / MOD  Sep. 25, 2013 at 14:44

Thanks, matt.
Yep - thought so...
Android fans, imho, have it wrong. It's non-Samsung Android makers vs the rest. Apple are largely unaffected by new Galaxy launches.
I actually believe a Tizen Galaxy will sell better than any non-Samsung Android flagship provided they get the basic 3rd party apps onboard. The absence of Instagram etc hurt WP badly.

Yeah, you're right. The opposite is also true, the launch of a new iPhone doesn't have any real effect on Samsung's profits or market share. They don't really compete with each other, they almost work together to keep the market (read: profit) to themselves.

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