Intel: Android not making effective use of multiple cores

Intel: Android not making effective use of multiple coresA couple of months ago, Nokia CEO Stephen Elop suggested that Android’s multi-core phones were simply a drain on battery, and not necessarily of benefit to consumers.

Now we’ve got Intel chiming in, adding that multi-core processors haven’t been properly optimised for Android.

Of course, this comes just as the Orange San Diego touches down with a single-core Atom processor, but Intel isn’t intimidated by its multi-core ARM-based rivals.

Indeed, Mike Bell, GM of Intel's Mobile and Comms Group, reveals: “We ran our own numbers and [in] some of the use cases we've seen, having a second core is actually a detriment, because of the way some of the people have not implemented their thread scheduling.

"The way it's implemented right now, Android does not make as effective use of multiple cores as it could, and I think - frankly - some of this work could be done by the vendors who create the SoCs, but they just haven't bothered to do it."

Speaking to The Inquirer, Bell hinted at multi-core Atom chips (inevitable, surely), but neglected to give an ETA.

Read more about: Android

Add a comment
7 comments

matt101101 / MOD  Jun. 11, 2012 at 11:04

There's no doubt that the x86 Atom chip in the San Diego is the most powerful core-for-core mobile chip we've seen to date. Unfortunately it's not 4 times as powerful as each core in the Exynos 4412 in the SGS3.

I agree that Android doesn't deal with quad-core chips effectively and much of their potential is wasted, dual-core chips on the other hand are fully supported in ICS (and GB?).

JanSt / MOD  Jun. 11, 2012 at 11:43

There are many factors, of course.
And one thing is clear: The HTC One S I had was faster than the One X... Go figure :p

matt101101 / MOD  Jun. 11, 2012 at 11:54

That's because the One S has an dual-core A15 based processor manufactured using the 28nm process and a qHD display, whereas the One X (intl. version) has a quad-core A9 processor manufactured using the 40nm process, running a 720p display.

Dual-core A15 (kinda) > Quad-core A9.

JanSt / MOD  Jun. 11, 2012 at 13:01

That's because the One S has an dual-core A15 based processor manufactured using the 28nm process and a qHD display, whereas the One X (intl. version) has a quad-core A9 processor manufactured using the 40nm process, running a 720p display.

Dual-core A15 (kinda) > Quad-core A9.


That whooshing sound just now... that was my nerd-limit going down the drain :p

matt101101 / MOD  Jun. 11, 2012 at 15:21

That's because the One S has an dual-core A15 based processor manufactured using the 28nm process and a qHD display, whereas the One X (intl. version) has a quad-core A9 processor manufactured using the 40nm process, running a 720p display.

Dual-core A15 (kinda) > Quad-core A9.


That whooshing sound just now... that was my nerd-limit going down the drain :p

Basically, the One X is a 4 x old technology and the One S is 2 x new technology.

New wins.

jaybear88  Jun. 11, 2012 at 15:33

2 extremely fast cores are better than 4 fast cores Jan :P. Plus, more intense screen on One X means more processing power being drained.

JanSt / MOD  Jun. 11, 2012 at 20:54

2 extremely fast cores are better than 4 fast cores Jan :P. Plus, more intense screen on One X means more processing power being drained.

Yes. It's not like I didn't know that.
But you know what's happening in network phone stores, right? The places where most 'ordinary' folks source their phones. They are told, "More cores, more better". And if the core number is the same, they say, "yeah, but the One X has 1pointblahblah"....

http://mobilesyrup.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/one-x-vs-sgs3-by-htc-1-e1339081370961.jpeg

Email:

You don't need an account to comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

Comment: