iPhone 5 tipped to rock NFC (again)

iPhone 5 tipped to rock NFC (again)It’s probably fair to say that Near Field Communication (NFC) hasn’t really taken off over here, but I still reckon Apple could change all that if it includes an NFC chip in the iPhone 5.

We already heard about PassBook at WWDC a couple of weeks ago, and now we’re hearing that there’ll be an NFC tie-in. Possibly.

According to 9to5mac, further investigation into hardware code dumps from iPhone 5 prototypes reveals that the iPhone 5 will indeed have NFC.

It’s been pointed out before that Apple already has loads of payment details on record via iTunes, meaning NFC-enabled iPhone 5 users could – in theory – starting making contactless payments with a minimum of fuss.

Jim Peters, CTO of SITO, says: “There is a lot of debate that NFC will never take off because of all the arguments. But you need to get ready, this is coming. This is going to happen.

“By the end of the year the majority of smartphones that you go and buy will have NFC on them. If in October the next iPhone comes out and it has NFC on it, it’s game over.”

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10 comments

barrybarryk  Jun. 26, 2012 at 11:07

t’s probably fair to say that Near Field Communication (NFC) hasn’t really taken off over here, but I still reckon Apple could change all that if it includes an NFC chip in the iPhone 5.Are you kidding? You can't even pay by card everywhere over here lol

krogothnx  Jun. 26, 2012 at 11:37

unfortunately, i can see there being a massive push for mobile payments if the new iPhone (after the iPad moving away from numbers i can imagine a similar move with the next iPhone), which i see as a terrible idea because it's just not practical or secure right now.

iirc it's a £15 limit on NFC payments right now, and there's no form of authorisation - meaning if someone steals your phone, they could be sitting in mcdonalds all day draining your bank account while being ironic and getting endless happy meals.

JanSt / MOD  Jun. 26, 2012 at 11:42

unfortunately, i can see there being a massive push for mobile payments if the new iPhone (after the iPad moving away from numbers i can imagine a similar move with the next iPhone), which i see as a terrible idea because it's just not practical or secure right now.

iirc it's a £15 limit on NFC payments right now, and there's no form of authorisation - meaning if someone steals your phone, they could be sitting in mcdonalds all day draining your bank account while being ironic and getting endless happy meals.


Agree.
Also: anything that contributes to the creation of a cashless 'society' is sheer evil, and anyone who disagrees with that view hasn't thought about it properly.

Having said that, and playing devils advocate: Most iPhones are already tied to a credit card via iTunes. So, if Apple play it right, at least consumers won't have to spread their seeds to yet another plot of bullsh*t fertilized soil.

barrybarryk  Jun. 26, 2012 at 11:54

I just don't see how (or why really, chip and pin can't cost that much to maintain) banks and payment providers have managed to convince people that moving from two-factor authentication to a single factor authentication system is desirable.

It's so far into "uh duh!" territory I can't believe the press has even been covering it.

JanSt / MOD  Jun. 26, 2012 at 12:05

I just don't see how (or why really, chip and pin can't cost that much to maintain) banks and payment providers have managed to convince people that moving from two-factor authentication to a single factor authentication system is desirable.

It's so far into "uh duh!" territory I can't believe the press has even been covering it.


Hahaha absolutely. And mind you, the banks that are bailed out by the customers whenever things go 'wrong'...they refuse to say how much money they lose to cc fraud, identity theft etc etc....

Treab  Jun. 26, 2012 at 12:57

Well technically this is wrong... he can buy a max of £90 worth of stuff.... NFC means that for every 7 swipes you need to put your pin into the machine on the 7th... strange system really...

barrybarryk  Jun. 26, 2012 at 13:12

Well no that's only if he steals the phone and uses it normally. In the real world that doesn't happen, they'll just literally skim the phone for the handshake details, bundle them into packs and sell them on. They don't even need to touch the bloody phone!

If you really want to check out the security of NFC just wonder why none of the major tech security companies have ever publicly investigated or come out in support of it.

JanSt / MOD  Jun. 26, 2012 at 13:27

Well no that's only if he steals the phone and uses it normally. In the real world that doesn't happen, they'll just literally skim the phone for the handshake details, bundle them into packs and sell them on. They don't even need to touch the bloody phone!

If you really want to check out the security of NFC just wonder why none of the major tech security companies have ever publicly investigated or come out in support of it.


Right.

jaybear88  Jun. 26, 2012 at 15:25

Will the NFC be passive or active in phones? ie will it be an overglorified form of an NFC tag that is sellotaped to the inside of the device (like Barclays already has) or will it be an active chip? It's bad enough when my phone dies during the day, but the idea of being stuck without cash as well is less than appetising. Worst thing is, people have a tendancy to avoid the application of logic where Apple is concerned and if they push it out, it will be pushed on everyone else as well.

pastyboy21  Jun. 26, 2012 at 17:21

Well technically this is wrong... he can buy a max of £90 worth of stuff.... NFC means that for every 7 swipes you need to put your pin into the machine on the 7th... strange system really...

That isn't correct, it is down to the merchant as to how they configure the nfc accounts for their customers. it tends to be down to number of transactions. for the majority of nfc credit/debit cards transactions are at about 3 to 4, before being forced online for a PIN authentication

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