LG G Flex 2 vs. Samsung Galaxy Note 4

LG G Flex 2 vs. Samsung Galaxy Note 4

The LG G Flex 2 officially got the ball rolling for high-end phones in 2015, launching earlier today at CES 2015 in Las Vegas. It’s not quite a flagship phone, true (the QHD G3 still holds the LG baton for now), but it does sound oddly appealing.

As such, we’re pitting the LG G Flex 2 against arguably the best of the big Android phones, the Samsung Galaxy Note 4.

LG G Flex 2 vs. Samsung Galaxy Note 4: design

The Samsung Galaxy Note 4 is the evolution of the evolution of the evolution of the world’s first big-time phablet, 2011’s Galaxy Note. It’s essentially a big old phone with a focus on multitasking shenanigans.

Unsurprisingly, the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 was rumoured to come in a metal body (par for the course for any in-production Samsung phone these days), but instead it arrived with a faux leather rear and stylish metal trim. Nice.

It’s worth noting that the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 launched alongside the Galaxy Note Edge, which has a bonus section of display down the right hand side for notifications and the like.

The LG G Flex 2, on the other hand, is an entirely different kettle of fish. It takes the 2013 LG G Flex and addresses two of our greatest concerns, namely size (6in) and resolution (720p), the former coming down and the latter going up. Phew!

The obvious USP on the LG G Flex 2 is its curved "banana" design, which brings the earpiece closer to your ear, and the mouthpiece closer to your – you guessed it – mouth. When you think about it, a rigid rectangle maybe isn’t the best shape for a smartphone after all. Is the LG G Flex 2 onto something?

LG F Flex 2 vs. Samsung Galaxy Note 4: unique features

Again, the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 is largely based around multitasking, with a myriad of software features including Multi Window, which lets you – for example – bring up a tiny wee calculator while perusing an invoice.

There’s also the S Pen, which now has 2,048 pressure registration points. In addition, it recognises factors like speed, direction and tilt, and supports writing styles including Calligraphy Pen and Fountain Pen.

Not to be outdone, the LG G Flex 2 has a “Self Healing” rear, and while the old model required up to three minutes to pull a Wolverine, the G Flex 2 will be right as rain in a matter of seconds.

LG G Flex 2 vs. Samsung Galaxy Note 4: display

The Samsung Galaxy Note 4 display measures 5.7in diagonally, with a 2560 x 1440 pixel arrangement. Yep, that’s 3.7 million pixels in the palm of your hand, with 515 pixels per inch (PPI).

At 5.5in, the LG G Flex 2 is a little smaller than the Samsung Galaxy Note 4, and while it’s just (“just”) 1080p, it still has an entirely respectable PPI score of 401. The LG G Flex 2 also boasts a special chemical treatment making it 20% more durable (presumably vs. the first Flex).

LG G Flex 2 vs. Samsung Galaxy Note 4: processor and RAM

Depending on the exact model, the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 comes with either a quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 or octo-core Exynos 5433 processor. Either way, you’re getting a full 3GB of RAM. More than enough grunt under the hood.

Meanwhile, the LG G Flex 2 is one of the world’s first phones with the spanking new 64-bit octo-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 810, paired with 2GB of RAM.

LG G Flex 2 vs. Samsung Galaxy Note 4: cameras

The Samsung Galaxy Note 4 matches the Galaxy S5’s 16MP rear camera, with the added bonus of OIS (Optical Image Stabilisation), which negates shaky hand syndrome and improves low-light performance.

The LG G Flex 2 appears to adopt the same camera tech as the LG G3, which is good news indeed. Specifically, you’re getting a 13MP rear shooter with laser-guided autofocus and – again – OIS.

We’ll have to wait and see what kind of pictures the LG G Flex 2 is capable of taking, but if it’s anything like the LG G3, you won’t have much to worry about.

On the front, the Samsung Galaxy Note 4’s 3.7MP camera pips the 2.1MP LG G Flex 2, but we doubt that’ll be a deciding factor for many people. Having said that, “selfies” are all the rage right now.

LG G Flex 2 vs. Samsung Galaxy Note 4: battery

The Samsung Galaxy Note 4 has a slightly larger battery (3,220mAh) than the LG G Flex 2’s 3,000mAh, though remember the former is powering – perhaps crucially – a larger, higher resolution display.

Both phones boast fast charging technology, with the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 promising to go from 0 to 50% in 30 minutes, while the LG G Flex 2 is a little slower at 40 minutes.

LG G Flex 2 vs. Samsung Galaxy Note 4: price

At the time of writing, LG G Flex 2 price is a mystery, though unofficial whispers suggest it’ll cost around £500 SIM free in the UK at launch.

The Samsung Galaxy Note 4, meanwhile, still commands north of £500, that’s despite rumours the price would drop 34% in 3 months. Son of a…

LG G Flex 2 vs. Samsung Galaxy Note 4: conclusion

Clearly the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 and LG G Flex 2 are two very different Android phones, with very different features. For what it's worth, here are the key differences:

  • the LG G Flex 2 is shaped like a banana and is slightly bendy
  • the LG G Flex 2 has the spanking new 64-bit Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor
  • the LG G Flex 2 has a "Self Healing" rear
  • the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 comes with a stylus
  • the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 has a slightly larger, higher resolution display (QHD vs. 1080p)
  • the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 has more RAM (3GB vs. 2GB)
  • the Samsung Galaxy Note has a higher megapixel count (front and back)
  • the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 has a larger battery (but powers a larger, higher resolution display)
  • both phones have fast charging capabilities
  • the LG G Flex 2 might be a tad cheaper than the Galaxy Note 4

Ultimately, it’s pleasing that the Flex brand has gone from ridiculous niche device to something that can genuinely hold its own against the big boys. Nice work, LG G Flex 2.

Read more about: Android

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6 comments

Treab  Jan. 5, 2015 at 20:32

I see Lewis continues to disappoint me... you discuss price twice... apparently ;)

lcurdie / MOD  Jan. 5, 2015 at 20:52

That's why you're officially my unofficial proofreader :p

Treab  Jan. 5, 2015 at 21:00

Someones gotta keep an eye on you ;) i still remember the app....

lcurdie / MOD  Jan. 5, 2015 at 21:09

I don't think we'll ever forget... the app.

Treab  Jan. 5, 2015 at 21:10

we should never forget .... the app....

lowers all flags to half masts....

matt101101 / MOD  Jan. 5, 2015 at 21:25

1080p and 2GB of RAM paired with a Snapdragon 810 seems like an odd match. Why cheap out on the display and the RAM and then equip it with the fastest processor ever fitted to a mobile phone?

The only high end phones which can get away with being sub-QHD in 2015 are the iPhone 6 and 6+; everything else needs to adapt or fail. It's like natural selection for smartphones haha :p.

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