JanSt

LOL Microsoft "large, flat, inert"...

An expert of symbolism had a go at Microsoft's new logo (allegedly, he didn't know what company owned the symbol):
The symbols suggested to him that the central theme of the logo was the 4 square tablets of color united by a white cross, which was a reference to the 4 elements, or the 4 directions united under a single commonwealth. Each of them indicated that the corporation was pulling itself into 4 different empires under the control of a single force. This might have been a typical symbol of a huge corporation broken down into 4 competing divisions, ruled by one CEO.

When asked whether the logo suggested mobile to him, Thrusting gave a negative answer and pointed out that the square is a symbol of stability, as therefore the company isn’t supposed to go anywhere. An interesting part of his explanation involved the fact that the square was repeated 4 times and two of the squares were on top of each other, which meant that they couldn’t move at all. In short words, the symbol suggests a large flat, inert company squabbling between its several divisions with a weak and ineffective leadership


via a site you possibly don't want to visit

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Kd4pRonvJ0A/UDcd11NNx7I/AAAAAAAAfZQ/vSf211jNfxg/s1600/MicrosoftNewLogo.jpg

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7 comments

JanSt / MOD  Sep. 4, 2012 at 19:20

Sorry, but even as a MS-sceptic I had a little chuckle.

Pondlife  Sep. 4, 2012 at 19:44

Yeah it was so far from the previous logo he couldn't possibly have known.
Did think it was odd to change to one so flat but does fit with their tiles thing I guess

JanSt / MOD  Sep. 4, 2012 at 19:57

Yeah it was so far from the previous logo he couldn't possibly have known.
Did think it was odd to change to one so flat but does fit with their tiles thing I guess

Yes, makes sense.

CTPAHHIK  Sep. 5, 2012 at 12:12

JanSt / MOD  Sep. 5, 2012 at 12:20

see: the round wheelie shape suggests a company in perpetual motion...
(That's £1000.00)

Craptologist  Sep. 8, 2012 at 13:23

Non-issue. It's not that outstandingly bad or good. So what's the big deal?

JanSt / MOD  Sep. 8, 2012 at 20:06

Non-issue. It's not that outstandingly bad or good. So what's the big deal?
Who said it's a big deal? We didn't turn it into a frontpage expose, did we :p
The guy is pulling interpretations from his a*s like a fairground hypnotist.

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