Motorola to lay off a further 1,200

Motorola to lay off a further 1,200We – the consumers – have yet to taste the fruits of Google’s $12.5 billion Motorola acquisition. That’ll come later this year with the Motorola X-Phone, but in the meantime it’s the staff that’s really feeling it.

Google’s first step post-acquisition was a hefty slice of global downsizing, but – unfortunately – it’s not done yet.

Having already laid off some 4,000 Motorola employees, a further 1,200 people are set to go across the US, China and India. That’s over 10% of Motorola’s entire squad.

A Motorola spokesperson mourns: "These cuts are a continuation of the reductions we announced last summer. It's obviously very hard for the employees concerned, and we are committed to helping them through this difficult transition."

An email to Motorola employees, as perused by The Wall Street Journal, explains: “our costs are too high, we're operating in markets where we're not competitive and we're losing money."

Worth mentioning that the lovely Christy Wyatt has disappeared from Motorola’s ranks. She moved to Citi after the acquisition by Google, and now heads something called Good Technology.

Ach, I’ll still find a way to slip her in now and again. Careful, I said slip her in.

Read more about: Android

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3 comments

JanSt / MOD  Mar. 8, 2013 at 14:22

A Motorola spokesperson mourns: "These cuts are a continuation of the reductions we announced last summer. It's obviously very hard for the employees concerned, and we are committed to helping them through this difficult transition."

That means, "we posted very clear exit signs", and they can use Google search for free when searching the local dole office. Win-Win

Pondlife  Mar. 8, 2013 at 15:26

And continues "If more of them had done a good job maybe we wouldn't have made so many useless decisions and churned out so many half arsed phones to limited markets in last few years... or maybe we could launch the v3 again.."

JanSt / MOD  Mar. 8, 2013 at 16:24

Well, I bet the decision makers still have a job and a bonus for the difficult transition.

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