Nokia at a loss over Lumia 800 battery issues

Nokia at a loss over Lumia 800 battery issuesNokia has promised to investigate user complaints of poor battery life on the new Lumia 800, nut admits it has no idea at this stage as to what could be the cause.

The company also promised that a pair of updates would be rolling out over the next couple of months to improve the handset's battery life, but that they had nothing to do with the problems being experienced.

The Lumia 800 is Nokia's first Windows Phone release, and as such it could really do with things going smoothly. But it seems the gods of fate have other ideas, as several users have reported that their battery life seems to drop a little every time they charge it, while others say their battery level has dropped by as much as 25% overnight, while the phone was completely idle and not in use.

Of course, the Lumia 800 is by no means alone in having teething problems. The iPhone 4 had Antennagate last year, while its successor – the recently launched iPhone 4S – has had battery life issues of its own.

And then there's the Samsung Galaxy Nexus and its randomly adjusting volume level control, which seems to have a mind of its own.

Still, it's the kind of problem Nokia could really do without, especially since it has admitted it has no idea what's causing it.

“We understand that some people have expressed concerns about battery life on the Nokia Lumia 800,” the company said in a response to complaints on the Nokia Support Discussions forum. “Early investigations show that most people are enjoying the full Nokia Lumia experience without any problems and we have not been able to identify a single root cause that would lead to erratic battery behaviour at this stage.”

However, it's not all bad news, as the post also revealed that Nokia has a pair of unrelated updates in the pipelines that will boost the Lumia 800's power performance.

“A software update in early December will make some improvements to power efficiency, while a second update in early January introduces high voltage charging, increasing the Nokia Lumia 800’s battery power from 1300mAh to 1450mAh.

“These are scheduled improvements and will enhance the overall experience, but are not designed to address any issues that may be occurring with individual products.”

Let's hope for Nokia's sake it can come up with something that is, and soon too.

Read more about: Windows PhoneNokia Lumia 800

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19 comments

JanSt / MOD  Nov. 24, 2011 at 18:56

it's not good for Nokia. Not good at all.
To think they are holding back Belle to keep all the spotlight on their WP effort... The mind boggles.

And let's not even say the M-word ;)
How's that Christmas bonus*, Mr Elop? (*no...the one from MS, of course)

timmmy123  Nov. 24, 2011 at 20:03

the only reason i would buy a lumia is so i could pretend i had a N9....

AhmadCentral  Nov. 24, 2011 at 20:48

This might sound crazy (hey i think people think i already am crazy after admitting i'm a bit of a motorola fanboy) but i think symbian is an awesome OS. Especially with Anna and Belle (and the new ones conming soon. Symbian has improved so much and is really nice to use. I think Nokia should never have signed on with Microsoft and just focused on MeeGo and Symbian.

yes i know that sounds crazy but i think symbian is a really good stable OS. Just needs more apps.

fneuf  Nov. 24, 2011 at 21:10

A bit of a Fake. By no mean you can tweak the capacity of a battery by changing its charge voltage. Furthermore, Li-ion battery technology is rather hazardous. If you exceed a +/-0,05v tolerancy on the nominal charge voltage the battery would be highly damaged. To some extent you could even explode it. Litteraly.

JanSt / MOD  Nov. 24, 2011 at 22:13

AhmadCentral - I'm with you on that one ;)

Treab  Nov. 24, 2011 at 22:21

you two need to be careful... i have seen people sectioned for less...

JanSt / MOD  Nov. 25, 2011 at 06:56

Were you 'inside' when you saw them? What else do you 'see'? Is it all blurry, or? :p

JanSt / MOD  Nov. 25, 2011 at 09:25

Fneuf,
All thumbs up for your knowledge, but I reckon after a few billion batteries Nokia have a vague idea of what they'll be doing - even if it's been reported in a distorted and simplified way.

Treab  Nov. 25, 2011 at 15:59

well janny considering i work in psychiatric nursing ;)

Treab  Nov. 25, 2011 at 15:59

well janny considering i work in psychiatric nursing ;)

JanSt / MOD  Nov. 25, 2011 at 16:11

Treab,
All I see is double :p

Treab  Nov. 25, 2011 at 16:17

bad sign... you need alot of help...

equ  Nov. 26, 2011 at 11:44

From my understanding lithium-ion batterys slowly degrade at a rate set by temprature and charge level, due to this there normaly is some extra capacity left (eg 100% charge is 95% of batterys "real" capacity), this is to extend the usable life of the battery as a "real 100% charge" is very damaging. So either Nokia messed up and left a hugh amount of spare capacity and is adjusting their charger to what it should be or they are using the "top bit" at the expence of greater wear and tear on the battery.

fneuf  Nov. 26, 2011 at 13:36

Fneuf,
All thumbs up for your knowledge, but I reckon after a few billion batteries Nokia have a vague idea of what they'll be doing - even if it's been reported in a distorted and simplified way.

@JanSt / MOD

Well, I simplified a bit the equation and was wrong on one point. You can't tweak the capacity of a battery by changing its charge voltage without lowering its lifetime. So, here is what I mean :
- Nominal charge voltage for Li-Ion is 4.2v,
- If you charge under this voltage, you'll get less capacity from the battery but will get more charge cycles. Numbers : at 4,1v you get ~10% less energy but extend the battery life by ~2.
- If you charge over this voltage, you'll get more capacity from the battery but will get less cycles. Numbers : at 4,3v you get ~6% more energy but reduce the battery life by ~4.
- Though, whatever the voltage you choose, during the charging operation you should not vary more from +/-0,05v around the chosen voltage. Fluctuation could damage the battery.
In certain conditions Li-ion battery technology is rather hazardous. To some extent you could even explode it (in general because of hotness).

If you are interested in the subject, I'll suggest you to read the paper written by Khosrow Khy Vijeh on eetimes.com (Current voltage and temperature govern Li-Ion battery charging) or this one powerelectronics.com (proper care extends li-ion-battery).

JanSt / MOD  Nov. 26, 2011 at 14:18

Thanks for the link!
Did mean to say that you were simplifying, by the way - I meant the many many sites that mis-reported the issue, and the unrelated update ;)

equ  Dec. 3, 2011 at 12:05

Good info Fneuf.
It would be a good feature for a futute phone to have settable battery modes eg "normal use" under charges the battery to preserve the batterys livfe and "Festival Mode" to store as much power as possible.
I think its terrible Nokia are "Over Charging" the Lumina batterys to get over bad battery life press as they wont be the ones paying for the replacement battery when the phone battery is shredded. Im sure they did their maths to make sure the battery will last the 6 minth warrenty period on the battery.....

fneuf  Dec. 5, 2011 at 18:31

We can't be sure but it's probably not overcharging. It's maybe more about getting closer to nominal spec of Li-Ion batteries.

As said, at 4,1v you get 10% less capacity. So approximatively ~1300mAh on a ~1500mAh battery. That seems really close to the original Nokia Discussion statement. And that would mean Nokia is getting back to the nominal charge voltage to give users the "missing 10%", yet loosing a bit of lifetime but not to the extent you are fearing.

abhaypadnit  Sep. 28, 2013 at 07:54

Fix to "Nokia Lumia Battery Draining"
Watch Solution at Following Youtube Video:
http://youtu.be/poofKB9JTmQ

JanSt / MOD  Sep. 28, 2013 at 08:59

Fix to "Nokia Lumia Battery Draining"
Watch Solution at Following Youtube Video:
http://youtu.be/poofKB9JTmQ


Man... who made that video? It's literally one paragraph of text if you reedit it. What is wrong with people? What a waste of bandwidth?!

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