JanSt

Official Blackberry Blog Hacked By Teampoison

Hacker group TeamPoison hacked the official Blackberry Blog and defaced the homepage.

Following RIM's statements regarding "cooperation with the authorities" to
bring London rioters to justice (it's widely assumed that looters used BBM to coordinated their actions), hackers threatened to take RIM and its staff to the 'cleaners'.

Screenshot of the full statement is in the post below. Here's a verified mirror of the defaced page:
http://zonehmirrors.net/defaced/2011/08/09/blogs.blackberry.com/

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14 comments

JanSt / MOD  Aug. 9, 2011 at 18:52

http://i1111.photobucket.com/albums/h476/JanMobot/SC20110809-171523.png

JanSt / MOD  Aug. 9, 2011 at 19:00

I do in no way condone the looting and criminal behaviour of the last 3 days - just as I do not appreciate the IPCC's fudging of events surrounding the Mark Duggan Killing (turns out, the police officer whose radio was shot, was actually hit by a police bullet while Duggan was unarmed)...
But I do believe liberties we in the west are so proud of are for the difficult times. Who needs privacy and liberties in dreamland? We criticise "3rd world" countries who pressure telecoms and RIM into collusion, but when thugs go nuts in the west, hey...sure, lets make every Londoner with a Blackberry a suspect....
Hmmm... all very depressing.
Opinions?

blizzard7  Aug. 9, 2011 at 19:34

It's a tricky one, but I feel RIM is simply doing what they've been told rather than taking the initiative to help the police.

Without getting too political, I know some people are struggling to make a living, but by stealing, looting and destroying other people's livelihoods, you are just making the problem worse by removing even more money from the local economy.

JanSt / MOD  Aug. 9, 2011 at 20:16

Agree about the looting...
The problem I have is that just cause it's technically possible and kind of 'removed' from reality (digital) it seems people are willing to accept digital snooping.
Essentially, I see no difference to, say, a landlord letting the police into your flat without a warrant, because you live in a trouble spot and have long hair or are a muslim...
Also: some BBM users have hundreds of contacts. Ppl who may not have been involved at all, may now be in a dragnet...

Again, we cringe when it happens in some dictatorship... Maybe I'm just too old? I remember when postmen or, indeed, cops could go to jail for opening a real letter without a very specific warrant.Agree about the looting...
The problem I have is that just cause it's technically possible and kind of 'removed' from reality (digital) it seems people are willing to accept digital snooping.
Essentially, I see no difference to, say, a landlord letting the police into your flat without a warrant, because you live in a trouble spot and have long hair or are a muslim...
Also: some BBM users have hundreds of contacts. Ppl who may not have been involved at all, may now be in a dragnet...

Again, we cringe when it happens in some dictatorship... Maybe I'm just too old? I remember when postmen or, indeed, cops could go to jail for opening a real letter without a very specific warrant.

JanSt / MOD  Aug. 9, 2011 at 20:20

PS - RIM, of course, is in a real dilemma. A lot of asses probably used good old sms or voice or or or...to single out RIM is a tad naughty. On the other hand, RIM posed as the defenders of privacy and civilisation when India wanted BES access....
ah, man... it's dark, really.

blizzard7  Aug. 9, 2011 at 20:41

Like I said, it's a tricky one :p RIM doesn't want to seem like the bad guys by covering up whether criminal movements really are being dictated by messages sent across BBM. Then again, releasing the info to the police is a breach of privacy akin to having a policeman stand outside your door and open every letter that comes to your house. Also as you say some people could be wrongly dragged into it.

This is a very 21st century problem though. Flash mobs etc. organised online and through messages can make it incredibly difficult for the police to keep up with what's going on without doing snooping unfortunately.

JanSt / MOD  Aug. 9, 2011 at 20:52

True.... just look at the pathetic performance of million dollar online security companies that get themselves hacked while lulzers take 10gigs here, 7 there....

CTPAHHIK  Aug. 10, 2011 at 11:58

Policy has to obtain a warrant for each individual they are interested in obtaining private information. This is on the case by case basis. No warrant - no info.
RIM should not try to be a hero, but rather focus on their product portfolio. You cannot break one law to uphold another - this makes you no different than looters on the street.

JanSt / MOD  Aug. 10, 2011 at 12:04

good points, ctpahhik

JanSt / MOD  Aug. 10, 2011 at 14:21

Unrelatedly:

Anonymous announced they will "take down" Facebook on Nov 5... well, over privacy concerns

JanSt / MOD  Aug. 11, 2011 at 17:20

Okay,
looks like the anonymous/facebook story was fake http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2390805,00.asp

matt101101 / MOD  Aug. 11, 2011 at 17:56

Yeah, the whole facebook hack thing was fake, Anonymous denied it on Twitter, said it wasn't their style basically.

JanSt / MOD  Aug. 11, 2011 at 18:49

So....

will Cameron follow through with a social nOtworking ban during times of, ahem, crisis...riots etc?
What next: no tweetin during election campaigns?

Seriously though? What about balance? Rioters/looters have always 'communicated' - banning it all during riots would mean no operation cleanup, no way for shop owners and residence to coordinate defence...

CTPAHHIK  Aug. 12, 2011 at 08:16

You cannot "take down" Facebook. This is same as taking down Microsoft or Google. You can only affect a subset of servers - it's not possible to take all of them down.
Some users will not be able to login into facebook or see some different page. Most will not even notice.

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