More on Samsung’s Exynos 5 Dual

More on Samsung’s Exynos 5 DualSamsung has been jawing about the Exynos 5 Dual since last November. Of course, back then it was the Exynos 5250. Same thing.

We had a wee update in May when it was rumoured that the Exynos 5 Dual might appear in a 2012 device, and now we gots more, er, stuff.

We’ve heard before that the Exynos 5 Dual is capable of processing a whopping 14 billion instructions per second, almost doubling the performance of a Cortex A9-based dual-core 1.5GHz processor.

Now, a new whitepaper from Samsung reveals more about the Exynos 5 Dual. Here are some of the key features:

  • Dual-core 1.7GHz Cortex A15 CPU
  • Mali T604 GPU
  • Support for WXQGA displays
  • 1080p 60 FPS video support
  • USB 3.0 support

If that gets you hot and bothered, head over to Android Authority – where the implications of the Exynos 5 Dual are studied in frankly insane detail. Check out some of the comments, too.

The Exynos 5 Dual is tipped to make its debut in a Samsung Galaxy Tab 11.6 with an eye-melting resolution of 2560 x 1600. Cripes.

Read more about: Android

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3 comments

matt101101 / MOD  Aug. 10, 2012 at 15:43

Looks like a good chip, I'm hoping (in vain) that this'll be in the Note 2.

barrybarryk  Aug. 10, 2012 at 16:31

Why anyone who doesn't do serious graphic work needs a resolution above 1080p on any device is still beyond me. There is zero content for the resolution, so anything displayed is still just upscaled from a lower res (especially for legibility on mobile device screens), so instead of visible pixels (which were never a problem before Jobs opened his mouth) we get soft edges, normalized colour and generally blurry images. Great.

matt101101 / MOD  Aug. 10, 2012 at 23:37

Why anyone who doesn't do serious graphic work needs a resolution above 1080p on any device is still beyond me. There is zero content for the resolution, so anything displayed is still just upscaled from a lower res (especially for legibility on mobile device screens), so instead of visible pixels (which were never a problem before Jobs opened his mouth) we get soft edges, normalized colour and generally blurry images. Great.
Good points, I think the answer is simply "bragging rights". Nothing more, nothing less.

It's a bit like the retina display MacBook Pro, which doesn't even use its full resolution with the standard settings, and if you change to settings to use the full resolution, everything becomes so tiny you can't see/read it properly. I can understand that kind of resolution on a large display, but why on a 15" laptop? Most ~15" laptops are still 1366x768 (which is perfectly usable, I know because I use that resolution @ 15.6" everyday).

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