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What speed does the iPhone 4's Wi-Fi go at?

Most Useful Answer tragictramp  Jun. 15, 2011 at 16:21

ITS WIRELESS N SO 300MB/S IF YOUR SYSTEMS RUNNING TIP TOP WHICH IS DOUBTFUL

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19 comments

JanSt / MOD  Jun. 15, 2011 at 15:58

In a nutshell: roughly the same speed as the pc/mac your connected to.

tragictramp  Jun. 15, 2011 at 16:21

ITS WIRELESS N SO 300MB/S IF YOUR SYSTEMS RUNNING TIP TOP WHICH IS DOUBTFUL

JanSt / MOD  Jun. 15, 2011 at 17:09

tragicchamp,
I'm guessing here, but: don'tcha think the OP meant web down-upload speed?

tragictramp  Jun. 15, 2011 at 17:12

both then lol

blizzard7  Jun. 15, 2011 at 17:15

...

blizzard7  Jun. 15, 2011 at 21:03

No way any iPhone 4 can do 300Mbps on any kind of connection due to power requirements. You would be lucky if you could achieve 10% of that in the real world. Most people reporting 14 MBs down being the absolute limit (even on Virgin 50 MB connection). https://discussions.apple.com/message/12136334?messageID=12136334

iamdamien  Jun. 15, 2011 at 22:44

@blizzard7, not true. I have managed upwards of 17MBs on my Uni campus connection.

tragictramp  Jun. 15, 2011 at 22:46

i see your point, but just done a speedtest myself and got 16.68meg download 1.87 meg upload this is with 20 meg virgin cable, this has nothing to do with what wifi it can actually thruput only the limit set by the broadband provider and your own network, for a full speed test a file transfer from one part of the network to the phone would show the truth.

blizzard7  Jun. 15, 2011 at 23:13

@iamdamien
Ahem, "most people"... *wink wink*. 16.6 Mb is also way short of the average of about 19 Mb that I used to get through my lappie's wireless on a 20 Mb Virgin connection. A true test would be a test on a 30 Mb+ connection though. Again I seriously doubt anyone can show me proof of an iPhone doing 10% of it's theoretical 300Mbps speeds even in super ideal conditions. I'd like to be shown otherwise though :)

CTPAHHIK  Jun. 16, 2011 at 11:30

Agree with Blizzard over power requirements.
Agree with everyone else over broadband connection being a bottleneck rather than WiFi speeds.

Theoretical bandwidth limit over WiFi (transferring files from PC to iPhone) would be somewhere in 2MB to 3MB range (megabytes, not megabits as broadband is measured). This is due to flash memory limitation. Keep in mind that phone file systems are very slow and when you downloading you have to store data somewhere.

I get around 7MB on laptop over 150Mbps WiFi.

CTPAHHIK  Jun. 16, 2011 at 11:35

Question about Virgin broadband for people with cable connections and BT fiber-optic customers.

I know that DSL is limited to 2MB/sec due to physical limitations of the phone line. I have O2 with 1.7MB/sec and my previous Sky broadband gave exactly same speeds. What kind of speed is reasonable to get from Virgin cable? BT fiber-optic?

jezcooke  Jun. 16, 2011 at 12:21

With Virgin cable you basically should get the speed you pay for (there can be problems with overcrowding, signal quality etc. but basically assuming everything's working as it should you get the advertised speed). I'm currently on Virgin 30 meg and speedtest.net gives me 32.51mbps down and 3.13mbps up (laptop via gigabit Ethernet). Naturally the speed to a given site is affected by the site in question and all the hops along the way etc.). I don't have an iPhone but for reference my iPad 1 (not sure how similar the WiFi is between the iPad/iPhone) gets a speedtest.net result of 27.24mbps down and 3.01mbps up.

mrew42  Jun. 16, 2011 at 12:35

With BT fibreoptic a friend is getting something like 35MBps out of what is promised as 40Mbps. He's happy enough though.
I'm running ADSL2+ as my exchange has been LLUd. I'm not as near to the exchange as i'd like so I "only" get 8Mbs. This is from O2 for less than a tenner a month. I'm happy too :)
Stick your post code in here to see what services are available
http://www.samknows.com/broadband/exchange_search

blizzard7  Jun. 16, 2011 at 12:50

In peak times on Virgin Media you can normally lose no more than 10% of your advertised speed. Other times, you'll be pretty much bang on what you're offered.

dangaio1  Apr. 4, 2012 at 19:41

Most of these answers are incorrect. 300 Mbps only refers to the "connection speed", and not your actual bandwidth/download speed which usually ranges from 1-25 Mbps.
Even new laptops are only capable of what's called Half-N connect speeds of up to 150 Mbps.
For instance, newer computers not laptops will connect at 300 Mbps if you have the correct hardware, but your actual download speed depends on your Internet price plan through your cable provider.
There is no documentation on whether or not the iPhone 4/4S can or cannot connect at 300 Mbps.
Most likely the iPhone 4/4S is only Half-N, and can only achieve a maximum connect speed of 150 Mbps.
Remember connect speed is not the same as download or upload speed.

faste  Nov. 16, 2012 at 10:34

Ah, see how the manufacturing marketing leads the blind consumer to spend their money on worthless kit!! The 802.11 speeds on the boxes refer to the maximum Physical data rate achievable on that device not taking into account all the protocol overheads which are LARGE. Best case actual data throughputs will typically be 40-60% less than the Phy rate. So when you buy an 802.11n access point that says 300 or 450Mbps that isn't close to what you will actually get….

Now if you take the iPhone 4S as an example it is 802.11n, but it only has a single RF chain (i.e. 1x1 MIMO) and it is unlikely to be using 40Mhz wide channels in 2.4Ghz band so therefore the maximum Phy rate is going to be 65Mbps (yep, not a lot better than the old 802.11g access point you chucked away that could do up to 54Mbps Phy rate!). Add into this the iPhones rubbish antenna and low transmit power (your access point can do 100mW, your iPhone ~35Mw) then your best actual throughput isn't going to be much more than 30Mbps if the moon and sun are aligned and the heavens are blue… Get yourself an iPhone 5 which supports 5Ghz and you should see double that.

glryrd  Feb. 27, 2013 at 21:52

No way any iPhone 4 can do 300Mbps on any kind of connection due to power requirements. You would be lucky if you could achieve 10% of that in the real world. Most people reporting 14 MBs down being the absolute limit (even on Virgin 50 MB connection). https://discussions.apple.com/message/12136334?messageID=12136334

agree. adapters can run n protocol but not handle higher speeds. I ran my iphone on a 100mb, but only got the lower speeds. better than b, but not as good as g.

glryrd  Feb. 27, 2013 at 22:02

This is the best answer! I wanted to know the radio type etc. thanks!

akhdkhkshg454654  Jul. 27, 2014 at 20:13

Iphone 4 's N wifi works only in the 2.4 ghz range and using a speedtest app on a fiberlink 200Mbps connection I got 23.25 mbps download and 16 mbps upload, being very close the the router ( ASUS AC56). Using the laptop I get +100 mbps results both DOWN/UPLOAD.
So the wifi on the iphone 4 is pretty much crap...

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