Stingy consumers drive down app prices, Android users are the worst

Stingy consumers drive down app prices, Android users are the worstIt’s no secret that Android users are notoriously tight when it comes to buying apps, with Apple’s App Store traditionally proving more lucrative for developers despite the smaller user base.

A new report from Flurry shows that Android users are spending an average of just 6 cents per app, significantly lower than their iOS-loving counterparts.

Us smug iPhone users are shelling out an average of 19 cents per app – that’s including apps that are free.

Evidently, iPad users have even more money to throw around, though that shouldn’t come as much surprise considering it’s very much a luxury device; no one needs an iPad, y’know?

The average iPad spend is way above that of Android and even the iPhone, at a whopping 50 cents per app.

A further graph shows how the volume of free apps on the App Store has increased over the years, from 84% in 2010 to 90% this year.

Of course, freemium apps – those that are free to download but offer in-app purchases and/or the ability to remove ads – are the in thing at the moment. It’s not uncommon for the highest grossing apps on the App Store to be almost entirely comprised of freebies.

Recent examples include Candy Crush Saga, which cheekily asks for 69p to progress beyond level 35(ish). Even colossal publisher EA has realised that freemium is the way to go, with Real Racing 3 costing 0p initially, but offering tons of stuff to buy within the game. Apparently, that works out better than charging an up-front £2.99 and leaving us to it. Sigh.

Flurry adds that we're all ultimately cheapskates, and would generally rather suffer adds than pay a few pence to remove them, writing: "Contrary to the desire for an ad-free experience, when faced with the choice between free apps with ads, or paying even $.99 for apps without ads, consumers overwhelmingly choose the free apps and tolerate the ads."

via: Flurry

Read more about: AndroidiOS

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7 comments

TJ Skywasher  Jul. 20, 2013 at 20:11

Sounds about right, most customers won't pay for anything digital never mind apps. I always opt for a paid version of an app if one is available, I can't stand ads. If it's a free app and there's an in-app option to remove ads then I always stump up my 69p to support the developer if it's an app I'm going to use.

satchef1  Jul. 20, 2013 at 23:05

If stingy customers drive down prices then Windows Phone owners must be loaded...

JanSt / MOD  Jul. 21, 2013 at 10:52

If stingy customers drive down prices then Windows Phone owners must be loaded... It's like BB10 - so many missing native features and official apps that people are willing to try anything. ;)

JanSt / MOD  Jul. 21, 2013 at 12:57

Heck... my cats just made me buy the pro version of this

quezi  Jul. 22, 2013 at 12:02

"that’s including apps that are free"

The fact that this analysis takes into account free apps, and then forms an average price across both paid and free apps is hugely misleading and a pretty poor analysis.

In this analysis - if Android has a much higher percentage of free apps then it will appear that customers are 'more stingy', whereas in reality the Android app store would simply be offering better value.

TJ Skywasher  Jul. 22, 2013 at 12:08

I've just read an article about a UK developer who's released a paid app recently on iOS and Android and out of the 3000 Android users currently playing the game only 20 have actually paid for the app. The rest are using a pirated version. This seems to be a common reason why a lot of apps are iOS only and why a lot of apps have to be free on Android to avoid the app being pirated. The trick for developers is how to get people downloading the app for free to pay for extras so they can earn a living.

JanSt / MOD  Jul. 22, 2013 at 12:30

"that’s including apps that are free"

The fact that this analysis takes into account free apps, and then forms an average price across both paid and free apps is hugely misleading and a pretty poor analysis.

In this analysis - if Android has a much higher percentage of free apps then it will appear that customers are 'more stingy', whereas in reality the Android app store would simply be offering better value.

First half makes you right. The second part not so much... what is 'better value'?

But then again, why quibble? Another bit of research a couple of weeks ago found that some 2/3 of iOS apps get downloaded as often as, well, never. No reason to assume the situation is different with the Play Store.
Pretty much everything we get to read and write about apps is nonsense - churned out by hired 'analysts', i.e. PR companies.

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